Sunday 30 October 2016

Social Sunday

Sundays used to be for lounging with the papers, now they are just as likely for lounging with iPads. So if you're lazily clicking around looking for something to read, here are a few suggestions, focussing on what's going on lit-wise in Asia.

(Inter)National Novel Writing Month

Part writing boot camp, part rollicking party, this November USA-based National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), which is actually an international event, celebrates its 18th year of encouraging novelists to get cracking, through the largest writing event in the world.

Friday 28 October 2016

Indie spotlight: Tabby Stirling

Indie Spotlight is Siobhan Daiko’s monthly column on self-publishing. This month Siobhan offers a platform to indie author Tabby Stirling.

Tabby now lives in Scotland with her husband, two children and a beagle, but she was previously an expat in Singapore. She has had several flash and short stories published in Spelk fiction, Camroc Fiction Press, Literary Orphans, Mslexia and others.

Tabby recently signed with Unbound, a UK-based literary crowdfunding publisher, for her novel Blood on the Banana Leaf. This shines a light on the maid abuse that came to her attention whilst she was living in Singapore. It explores how women cope in the most demeaning of circumstances.

Over to Tabby…

Wednesday 26 October 2016

The Sellout by Paul Beatty wins Man Booker Prize for Fiction

The Sellout by Paul Beatty  has won the 2016 Man Booker Prize for Fiction. The Sellout is published by small independent publisher Oneworld, who had their first win in 2015 with Marlon James’ A Brief History of Seven Killings.

Friday 21 October 2016

Questions & answers: Alexandra Curry

About Alexandra Curry: Alexandra is a Canadian-born author of Austrian and British parentage. She has lived in Asia, including in Singapore and Taiwan, in Europe, and in Canada. Her current home is in the United States. She says: “No doubt about it, my background has been shaped by several cultures, and the way I see the world is very much informed by the way these cultures have blended together for me.” She has worked as a teacher, model, banker and accountant.  The Courtesan is her first novel.

Monday 17 October 2016

Just quickly...

I'm very pleased that The Elephant Bar, a short story I wrote for Illustrated London News / Raffles Magazine  is now online.  Never mind the words, I LOVE the illustrations. Click here to see them! The story is set in colonial-era Siem Reap, and concerns an ingénue mixing it with a mysterious Russian photographer...

Sunday 16 October 2016

Sunday Social

Sundays used to be for lounging with the papers, now they are just as likely for lounging with iPads. So if you're lazily clicking around looking for something to read, here are a few suggestions, focussing on what's going on lit-wise in Asia.

Friday 14 October 2016

Asia Literary Review and English PEN

English PEN in association with the Asia Literary Review has just announced a terrific opportunity for translators and writers in East and South-East Asia - a new translation project and award, PEN Presents East and South-East Asia.

Sunday 9 October 2016

Social Sunday

Sundays used to be for lounging with the papers, now they are just as likely for lounging with iPads. So if you're lazily clicking around looking for something to read, here are a few suggestions, focussing on what's going on lit-wise in Asia.

Saturday 8 October 2016

Karachi Literature Festival travels to London

To celebrate 70 years of Pakistan’s creation, Pakistan’s biggest literary event, the Karachi Literature Festival (KLF) produced by Oxford University Press (OUP), will be launched in London on 20 May 2017 at the Southbank Centre, as part of their annual Alchemy festival. KLF London promises to be a vibrant celebration of Pakistani literature and arts, providing a fantastic opportunity for Londoners to gain an insight into the country’s complex history and culture.

Friday 7 October 2016

500 words from Graham Sage

500 words from...is a series of guest posts from authors writing about Asia, or published by Asia-based, or Asia-focused, publishing houses, in which they talk about their latest books. Polyglot Graham Sage divides his time between London, China and France. His previous books include an English-language primer for use in China, and the French-language novel Les tribulations de J. Alfred Prufrock au pays des moas géants. In November, he will publish The Phoenix and the Crow, his first novel in English.

The Phoenix and the Crow is a tale of morality and corruption in present-day small-town China. Wang Bin a young teacher and ornithologist from Beijing travels to Pingyang, a small town nestled in the mountains between Sichuan and Hunan. His aim is to photograph the mountain phoenix, a rare bird with a blaze of rich colours that has never before been captured on film.

Wang Bin soon crosses paths with Pingyang’s, chief of police, a cruel man who rules with an iron fist. The chief of police tries to drive Wang Bin permanently out of town. But Wang Bin is falling in love with Xiao Zhou, a pretty receptionist at the seedy hotel where he’s been staying. Wang Bin, Xiao Zhou and other townsfolk concoct a plan to rid Pingyang of its dreadful chief of police – a plan so far-fetched all agree it might just work.

So, Over to Graham…

Sunday 2 October 2016

Social Sunday

Sundays used to be for lounging with the papers, now they are just as likely for lounging with iPads. So if you're lazily clicking around looking for something to read, here are a few suggestions, focussing on what's going on lit-wise in Asia.

Saturday 1 October 2016